Caring in a time of crisis

Ms Vivienne Ng, Chief Psychologist, Ministry of Social and Family Development

Since its launch on 10 April 2020, the National CARE Hotline has managed 20,900 calls from the community. Behind the setting up and operations of the hotline is a huge amount of coordination required across various parties including Ms Vivienne Ng.

The Chief Psychologist of MSF and her team had only about a week to rally volunteers because of the urgency to provide emotional and psychological support to those facing difficulties with the stressors brought about by COVID-19. They quickly reached out to the multi-agency National CARE Management System (NCMS), led by the Ministry of Health, to tap on CARE officers who are trained to provide emotional support during crises.

As of June 2020, over 770 Duty CARE officers from government agencies, community partners and in private practice, have stepped forward to man the Hotline. “We are encouraged by the sheer number of volunteers who offered their help, with everyone understanding the urgency of the Hotline and wanting to help fellow Singaporeans in need,” says Vivienne.

Professional bodies like the Singapore Psychological Society (SPS), the Singapore Association for Counselling (SAC) and the Singapore Association of Social Workers (SASW) also reached out to their members to volunteer for the Hotline.

On the rallying of volunteers, Vivienne said, “It was truly a public-private-people partnership that went beyond our wildest hopes.”

Besides being the CARE coordinator at MSF, Vivienne oversees National CARE Hotline’s volunteer recruitment, briefing and rostering, management of supervisors, call centre operations, data analysis and research. When she needed help with understanding what goes into setting up a hotline and managing telephony records, she reached out to experienced colleagues handling MSF’s other Hotline operations such as ComCare.

She and her team also relied on community partners for technical support. The social enterprise Agape Connecting People provided a call system and customer service officers to prioritise calls for the Hotline.

The major concerns of callers to the National CARE Hotline relate to mental health, emotional support, family issues and employment. Duty CARE Officers are the first line of assistance, providing a listening ear to callers. If callers require longer-term specialised support, the officers link them to community partners, such as the Institute of Mental Health, Samaritans of Singapore, Temasek Foundation’s My Mental Health, Agency for Integrated Care, Community Psychology Hub’s Online Counselling Platform and Viriya Community Services.

Coordinating the various aspects of the Hotline to ensure smooth operations can be intense and Vivienne says that she worked late into the night during the first few weeks following the launch of the Hotline. Nevertheless, she enjoys the fast pace and quick problem-solving aspects of crisis and disaster-related work. Most of all, she is motivated by the impact made by National CARE Hotline.

“I’m always so encouraged when I read shift reports and hear about the different people the Duty CARE officers have helped, the tragedies we averted and lives touched,” she says. “Some even call back to compliment the service and thank our Duty CARE officers.”

Working on National CARE Hotline has reminded Vivienne of her post-graduate days, when she studied for a Master’s degree in Psychology at the University of Western Australia and volunteered weekly at the Samaritans’ suicide helpline.

She handled calls in the middle of the night and “de-escalated strong emotions of people in severe crisis, including people holding guns to their heads”. Three decades later, she says she is again reflecting on the “hidden lives of people”, such as those who suffer from mental health problems that have been exacerbated with COVID-19 and others who have experienced a change of fortunes because of COVID-19.

“While we can’t solve all their problems, people need a listening ear, an empathetic response – they need to feel cared for and less alone. We can also point them in the right direction to get more help.”

In this regard, you need not be a clinical professional or part of the National CARE Hotline to help, says Vivienne. “If we all reach out to our neighbours, friends and relatives around us, ask them how they are doing and really listen, there will be less isolation, more community spirit and building of relationships. 

“In this way, we can all help one another.”      

TIP BOX
Here are some tips from Vivienne on dealing with fears of COVID-19 and adapting to life after the Circuit Breaker:

– Take time to ease yourself back into a work and family routine, expecting some disorganisation and adjustment.
– While fears about COVID-19 still abound, remind yourself that community spread is currently very low and the probability of contracting the virus is very low, too, as long as necessary safety precautions are taken.
– Do not be consumed with worries about the illness, but re-engage with life, family, friends and the community while exercising care.
– Exercise regularly, eat healthily, maintain a regular sleep cycle, engage in hobbies and learn new things.
– Spend time talking and interacting with family and friends, either in person where possible or via video conferencing platforms.

If you need or know of someone who needs help, please contact the National CARE Hotline at 1800-202-6868.

If you are a mental health professional and would like to volunteer for the hotline, email the National CARE Hotline at nationalcarehotline@msf.gov.sg

Stepping forward to do good

Since the start of COVID-19 Support Grant (CSG) applications on 4 May 2020, MSF received about 48,000 applications from those whose jobs have been affected by the COVID-19 crisis.

While applications are mostly done online, there are some who need help with their applications and apply directly at MSF’s Social Service Offices (SSOs).  Volunteers like Ms Crystal Choy have stepped forward to help these applicants alongside our MSF colleagues.

Crystal photo (final)
Ms Crystal Choy volunteering to help applicants for the COVID-19 Support Grant

“The applications can be done entirely online, but some older Singaporeans still prefer to come down to the SSOs for assistance as they don’t have the technological skills to use phones or laptops,” she says. “As I’m more tech-savvy, I want to give back to society by helping our seniors and others who may need help applying for the help schemes.”

The 24-year-old is a programme management executive at the Civil Service College who responded to an email call for volunteers, because she wanted to do something meaningful for those in need during this uncertain economic period.

Stationed at the SSO @ Bukit Merah, Crystal helps five to ten individuals per day to apply for the CSG. After first checking if they are eligible for the Grant and their supporting documents, she walks them through the online application process.

As some of these applicants did not qualify for CSG, Crystal promptly directed them to our SSO colleagues who supported them through other assistance, such as the ComCare scheme. ComCare provides financial assistance and holistic support to low-income individuals and families to help them through difficult times and regain stability.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the SSOs are exercising greater flexibility to support those in need. For example, since April 2020, new ComCare beneficiaries receive at least six months of assistance to help tide them through their financial challenges.

Households, whose ComCare assistance expires from now till July 2020, will also have their assistance automatically extended for a further six months without having to approach the SSOs.

Crystal is thankful for every success story in her volunteering stint. “Seeing people who are financially vulnerable receive help to support their families is very encouraging,” she says.

And though this period has proved to be a difficult one for Singaporeans, it has not stopped Crystal from stepping out of her comfort zone to volunteer.

“Being deployed to an SSO, I’ve encountered people from all walks of life whom I don’t usually meet in the course of my work,” she says.

Crystal encourages other Singaporeans to seek out volunteering opportunities in our collective fight against COVID-19.

“This is a time when Singaporeans need to be there for one another, and stand united,” says Crystal.

If you want to join Crystal in supporting fellow Singaporeans, visit sgunited.gov.sg.

More on COVID-19 help schemes at supportgowhere.gov.sg.

ComLink – Government and partners coming together to support families

Thomas (not his real name) has been battling with a slew of medical issues, such as diabetes, gout, high blood cholesterol and sleep apnea.

In March 2019, the father of three was dealt another blow – he lost his job at a laundry delivery business because his employer felt he was taking sick leave too often. His wife, a cashier, ended up as the family’s sole breadwinner, bringing home just over S$1,500 a month.

This meant that the family of five, who has been living in a two-room rental flat in Marsiling for the past five years, had to shelve their dreams of buying a new home.

With the launch of Community Link (ComLink), more help is now on the way to Thomas and his family.

ComLink was introduced by the Ministry of Social and Family Development and the Ministry of National Development to provide proactive, collaborative and community-driven support to families in need, and to empower them to lead better lives. There are various programmes under ComLink, which are run by different community and corporate partners and tailored to the needs of the local community. For example, reading and numeracy programmes for young children, sports activities for students, Community Scouting for youths, as well as skills upgrading and job matching services for residents.

These programmes were curated based on suggestions by residents at several focus group discussions. Thomas was one of the participants in a 2019 discussion on homeownership. Held in Marsiling, the discussion was conducted by National University of Singapore undergraduates from the Chua Thian Poh Community Leadership Centre, together with the Social Service Office (SSO) @ Woodlands, Housing and Development Board (HDB) and Care Corner Family Service Centre (Woodlands) who also reached out to residents from rental flats to find out and address their needs.

Some of the fellow residents in Marsiling whom Thomas met struggled with bankruptcy while others had to sell their flats as part of divorce settlements. “Many have their own family problems. Each had their stories to share and we got to know one another better,” he says.

He was pleased that the small group format of the discussion facilitated personal sharing. “In a small group, we could talk about whatever we wanted and get advice on what to do. It can be very hard to talk if the group is too big.”

One of the major issues raised by participants in that discussion was employment. As Thomas experienced firsthand, a family’s plan for a brighter future can be quickly derailed with the loss of a job.  After hearing the residents’ struggles with this issue, SSO @ Woodlands worked with employment-related agencies like FastJobs and Workforce Singapore to develop targeted job programmes for Marsiling residents.

Another important point that emerged during the discussion was the need for easy access to assistance. Thomas shared that it could be confusing to navigate the services offered by different agencies. Thanks to the initiatives by Marsiling ComLink in bringing together multiple partners to address residents’ needs, he is now more aware of where he can seek financial assistance, what kind of HDB loans are available and how he can seek help from other community partners and Members of Parliament.

Recognising the aspirations of residents to own their own homes, the SSO @ Woodlands will be working closely with HDB’s Home ownership Support Team (HST) to help families on their journeys towards buying a flat.

HST was launched in 2019 to provide dedicated and more personalised services for rental households who are ready for homeownership. HST guides these households, from application to key collection, and will be a consistent point of contact to address all HDB-related issues.

Besides MSF, HST also works with other social service agencies and partners, such as the Ministry of Manpower, Family Service Centres (FSCs), and The Institute of Financial Literacy to provide holistic support for rental tenants along their home ownership journeys.

Two of Thomas’ children, aged 14 and 12, attended a trial session on basic money management at the new newly launched ComLink programme space in Marsiling. They shared that the session was both fun and useful.  They are eager to participate in other ComLink programmes where they can get to know their neighbours better. With the support provided through ComLink, Thomas is actively searching for a job with the goal of stabilising his family’s finances and working towards the family’s dream of home ownership again.

A meeting of generations and needs

A meeting of generations and needs

Every fortnight, the halls of Thye Hua Kwan (THK) Nursing Home echoes with chatter between residents and students from Xinmin Secondary School.

As part of the school’s Values in Action Programme, the students befriend the elderly by folding origami, playing carom and engaging in various activities. This initiative originated from one of the SG Cares Community Network Sessions held in September last year at Braddell Heights Community Club, attended by community partners from Serangoon and Hougang towns.

Dr Desmond Ong, grassroots leader of the Ang Mo Kio-Hougang Division shared that “people just come together—no agenda—and we just share. We share our problems, what we have in terms of resources and see what we can make of it.”

Xinmin Secondary School contacted the Social Service Office, SSO @ Hougang, initiating a longer-term community engagement programme, instead of one-off sessions. “We want our students to generate a deeper sense of empathy through the Values In Action project,” says Vice-Principal Benjamin Yong.

SSO @ Hougang promptly put the school in touch with THK Nursing Home, along with another partner in the area, NTUC Health’s Day Centre for Seniors (Silver Circle) at Ci Yuan.  Soon after, partners from the two organisations conducted briefings for the students on how they could interact and engage the elderly meaningfully.

Since the XinminCares programme kicked off in February this year, the residents look forward to the visits by the students, says THK Nursing Home’s CEO Ardi Hardjoe.

“For us, the collaboration is important because we have a duty to the young generation,” he says, pointing out the importance of getting students to understand the experiences and needs of the elderly. Some students, he notes, might not have had much interactions with their grandparents and might be unsure how best to relate to the elderly.

Besides visiting the residents at THK Nursing Home, the students also befriend seniors at the NTUC Health’s Day Centre for Seniors (Silver Circle). The befriending experience has inculcated patience in the students, as some seniors at the centre may have dementia and often repeat the same questions to the students.

As part of XinminCares, the students also make visits outside the walls of THK Nursing Home. This part of the programme is known as Project Home Alone. The students knock on doors to check on and befriend seniors who stay alone in the Ang Mo Kio-Hougang Division.

For Desmond, the highlight of the programme has been witnessing the students’ resilience in reaching out to the seniors, persevering even when they faced initial resistance. This has not disheartened the students.

From Desmond’s observations, the stereotype about the young being part of a strawberry generation who bruise easily is not true and these students deserve credit for their work. They believe in the project as much as the partners, he says.

Benjamin adds that one indicator of success in the coming years will be whether the youths will still take the initiative to volunteer even after they graduate. He says some former students, who are now in their twenties, continue to actively volunteer.

THK Nursing Home, NTUC Health’s Day Centre for Seniors (Silver Circle) and Xinmin Secondary School are united in seeing this project through, challenges and all, for the long haul.

Ardi hopes this collaboration, bringing a school and a nursing home together, could set a positive example for other schools.

“We can share our story with others and…they can learn from this.”

 

Curating needs-driven help in the social sector

The following is an excerpt from Minister Tan Chuan-Jin’s opening speech at the Eagles Leadership Conference 2017 at Suntec Convention Centre.

Eagles Leadership Conference has been encouraging many of the companies to come together to collaborate and to do good. I thought it’s useful before we proceed, to actually ask ourselves, and to remind ourselves again – why is it the right thing to do? We assume we know that this is the correct thing, but we should pause, and ask ourselves why is it so fundamentally important? How do you talk about this at the national level, where as individual Singaporeans, we begin to look beyond self?

We can put up the rhetoric about being a caring and inclusive society, but the question is: What do you do about it? It’s easy to talk, but we must be able to break it down into bite-sized chunks that we can do. If we believe that it is fundamentally important, then we have to ask ourselves, what can we do? Which is where it comes back to where we started from – this desire to do good.

The social sector is about bringing people on board, and being involved. And that’s where I think we can begin building a very different society. So what do we do? There are basically three buckets that I’m looking at.

Schools – Nurturing every child to desire to do good

Firstly, schools. Imagine the vision where it is possible for us to nurture in every child who leaves the education system with a desire to do good, to want to care for others. Is it possible?

Last week, I visited Bedok View Secondary School. They partnered Katong APSN to cook together with students with special needs during recess time. When I talk to the students and read the reflections of those who have participated in these activities, you know that there has been a change. They learn to care for others, to be more patient. You find that true of many other equivalent activities. Could we work with the schools so that we programme more of these activities? If you curate programmes like Values-In-Action well, you can imagine how this could have a significant impact.

Corporates – Providing opportunities to do good together

Secondly – Corporates. In the corporate world, many of us are increasingly beginning to build more social responsibility. It is important to remind ourselves why it is so fundamentally important. We know that many young people desire to do good, but they don’t always find those opportunities. A recent survey by NVPC pointed out that 50 per cent of companies do provide such opportunities. The overall participation is about 41 per cent for those under 25 years old – it can increase, and I think it should increase. By the 25-34 age group, there is a dip to 29 per cent. After school, they enter the workforce, they have other distractions. This is where we should try again to work within this space, pull the different groups together to collaborate. What other activities do you have to bring employees together to do something meaningful together? Imagine doing this as a company, with your department, the relationships will go deeper, because we are engaging in an activity that is fundamentally different. That happens with the students in school. That can happen with a corporate entity as well.

Community – Coordinating efforts for more needs-driven help

The third bucket is the local community. If you can coordinate volunteerism among neighbours, where they visit elderly folks or those with special needs within the same block of flats, it strengthens neighbourly ties. When you talk about nation-building itself, it sounds very deep, but it comes down to relationships. There is a virtuous cycle that builds on itself, at school, at work, at home. We begin to come together to collaborate, being more needs-driven, rather than creating projects.

How can we begin to look at longer-term partnerships, curate and meet real needs, and do preventive work? When we begin to organise ourselves, when we begin to hub, when we begin to share information and understand the needs, there’s a tremendous amount of good we can do. But more importantly, I think it has a tremendous impact on who we are as individuals.

Facilitating volunteerism between companies and social service organisations

Let me cite you some examples on how we can facilitate volunteerism more conveniently. NCSS, for example, has piloted a new service-based volunteerism model. So volunteers can come into direct contact with beneficiaries, and partner to work with them on a regular basis. Corporate organisations are valuable because they will organise their volunteers and volunteering schedule.

The Japanese Association, for example, have been volunteering with MINDS regularly for 20 to 30 years. Basically what happens is that the afternoon programme for that day is settled, and MINDS can free up their trained staff to do the complex work, which we as average volunteers are not able to do. This allows our VWOs to expand their capacity without necessarily getting help. So we want to curate that experience, expand the partnership.

Another example, SP Group volunteers at the Senior Activity Centre in Geylang Bahru, which is under Touch Community Services. They conduct morning exercises for the elderly and serve them breakfast. This partnership with 20 staff from SP Group began in February 2017. The elderly residents clearly find some of these faces familiar, because of the regularity, and look forward to meeting some of them. The volunteers from the group reported a higher sense of morale and satisfaction.

POSB Bank has embarked on a service-based volunteering model. Staff from 4 branches, located in Jurong, started their volunteering session in May with NTUC Health Nursing Home. About 20 employees per session befriend elderly residents, who would otherwise would have little contact with the community. Many of them will volunteer early in the morning before they go to work, and the banks, where possible, adjust to make sure that there’s flexible time.

I would also encourage you to consider the programme Share As One. Many of you in Singapore will know what it is, where we commit a dollar or two a month from our paycheck to Community Chest. Even for my own ministry, we have made it opt-out. Everybody, as a default, will contribute. You can opt-out if you wish to. Companies are sometimes wary about doing this, but you will be surprised. There is actually a very positive response to it. It may not seem much, but it makes a lot of difference when you ensure that there is a steady stream of funds to the Community Chest – where every single dollar goes to beneficiaries. With the Share As One programme, what we will do is to look at your contributions as a company, whatever additional you are able to bring to bear, we will match that and we will also provide funding to your company to fund your company’s activities. So I do encourage you that as we embark on trying to broker, and trying to structure better programmes, participate in the Share As One Programme as well, so that funds can also come in.

Building a different Singapore, step by step

Perhaps the theme for this conference is about what we can be and do as better leaders. This is what I put to you as you think about leadership, how by embracing some of these activities in the right spirit, you can actually make a tremendous amount of difference. I would urge you to do more, step up and curate the journey. Step by step, individual by individual, we begin to change. Society will change. And we will build a very different Singapore.

 

Chinese New Year – Looking out for each other

Chinese New Year is a particularly hectic, but meaningful period for me. It gives me an opportunity to meet up with my residents during our visits to the shops and town centers, and in some of the festive activities organised.

Having been around the community nearly 6 years now, it is a joy to catch up with familiar faces. The young ones are growing up fast and some have gotten too big to carry! With the passing of time, many are also getting older. Some have passed on to a better place, while some have become more frail. A few ‘regulars’ at our Meet-The-People sessions haven’t been very regular for some time, and I sometimes wonder how they are. But when I saw them on my rounds recently, they were looking better than ever before! It had taken awhile for some, but the help extended by so many have made a difference.

So do remember to look out for those around us even as we visit our families and friends. For those who are alone and without much social contact, do pop by and say hello and see how they are. Some of us can help via the VWOs, while some can reach out to our community and to those living near us.

It may not seem much, but it can make a difference. Last Chinese New Year, we read of volunteers who have been organising a community reunion dinner to celebrate with elderly residents who lived alone in their neighbourhood. This is just one of many examples that I am sure we will see again this year. We also read that charities are receiving more donations last year compared to previous years. These developments are heartwarming and encouraging.

Let us continue to foster this sense of caring and giving. With each step and effort, we strengthen family and community. In so doing, we are all forging a closer-knit and a more inclusive society.

May you and your family have good health and happiness in the year of the Rooster! 恭喜发财, 万事如意, 合家欢乐!

Family is where the heart is

min-leaves.png

(Taken on a family trip to Japan, Dec 2016)

The picture you see above was first shared on my Instagram page, which received an interesting comment: “落叶“.

Literally translated, this phrase refers to how the fallen leaves have returned to its roots. The fallen leaves are a metaphor for old age, and ‘roots’ describe one’s home.

In a related way, I think ‘roots’ also represents our families – where our values, memories and ties were first formed, and firmly anchored. If you think about it, the family really is the building block for a safe and stable society, and it is important for our families to stay strong. Families are also who we turn to for comfort and support, and a refuge when times are difficult and uncertain.

Giving children a good start in life

14907134_1259299637446142_4615688304235518474_n

(During my visit to one of the KidSTART group sessions at Henderson.)

This year, we’ve made some progress to enhance our support to help strengthen families, as well as to help our children get a good start in life. It’s a continual effort, and I’m proud of the work put in by my MSF team. It is a cause they feel passionate about.

For example, to help couples build stronger marriages, we have been offering an evidence-based introductory marriage preparation programme, PREP, free-of-charge, at the Singapore Registry of Marriage (ROM) during lunch time.

To give our children a good start in life, we rolled out additional support measures this year. All newborns now get a $3,000 Child Development Account First Step grant. Changes to the Child Development Co-Savings Act accorded all new mothers the full 16-week maternity leave, and mandatory two weeks of paternity leave for new fathers from 2017. We made important moves on maternity leave and the CDA account to better support unwed mothers.

KidSTART is a pilot programme that aims to provide more assistance to children from vulnerable backgrounds to ensure their future success. This effort by the Early Childhood Development Agency brings together family, community and pre-schools to build a strong support system for the child. I look forward to meeting the little ones at their first day of (pre)school in a few days’ time. 🙂 I trust that this programme will succeed and move on beyond its pilot status.

Faishal has also shared in his blog post about the work done to help parents via the Positive Parenting Programme and the Safe and Strong Families pilot, as well as to support parents and children amidst divorce.

We are also working to further develop the early childhood education sector to offer meaningful and rewarding careers for Singaporeans, and quality care and education for our children. We announced the Early Childhood Manpower Plan this year, and we hope to attract another 4,000 educators by 2020.

Building a community of support for those in need

Notwithstanding our best efforts, unfortunate circumstances do occur. We need to be always ready to provide help and timely services to the more vulnerable in society.

Our ComCare schemes disbursed $130 million to about 87,000 beneficiaries in FY2015, this is 10% higher than the previous financial year. We have also enhanced the assistance package to households on ComCare Long-Term Assistance by raising the cash assistance rates for our beneficiaries. For example, a one-person household will now receive $500 per month from $450. We will continue to work closely with the community and voluntary welfare organisations to support the less unfortunate among our midst.

Even as we recognise families as important sources of refuge and support, sadly, for some, they can be vulnerable to abuse by loved ones. Last month, we launched a three-year “Break the Silence” campaign to encourage bystanders to speak up against family violence. Violence is not a private matter and is not acceptable.  All of us have a role to play to step up and help, by having the courage and knowledge to take action.  You can interrupt incidents of family violence with little acts of kindness, and contact the various help centres. Do call the Police immediately if a life is in danger.

 


(Ah Ma made the first step to break the silence against family violence.)

For those who need foster homes and families for support, we were pleased to see an increase in fostering as we celebrated 60 years of fostering in Singapore. Foster parents are such incredible big-hearted folks who open their homes and heart to care for vulnerable children. To further support the efforts taken to help these children, a third fostering agency will be set up in 2017.

Fostering a more inclusive Singapore

We have also achieved much in helping each and every Singaporean to fulfil their potential, regardless of their abilities. In the past two years, MSF, together with MOE and SG Enable, piloted the School-to-Work Transition Programme with five Special Education schools to facilitate a smooth transition from school to the workplace for graduating students with disabilities. I am heartened that 80% of the first graduating cohort of were successfully employed, and 83% stayed in the job for more than six months.

Just last week we received the 3rd Enabling Masterplan report from the steering committee led by Ms Anita Fam. We will study their findings and recommendations carefully to make Singapore even more caring and inclusive for persons with disabilities.

Supporting one another in the year ahead

While MSF continues to do its best to support the vulnerable and those in need, and strengthen families so that they can fulfil their dreams, it is also my hope that fellow Singaporeans can do their part to care for one other.  If we could all reach out to others in the community, and begin to look beyond ourselves and our own families, we would begin to see a very different society – one that is more caring, more selfless and more compassionate.

One way you can show support to one another is through the Singapore Cares movement. Many of us have expressed the desire to do more and work with others to support individuals and families that need help. The movement is an opportunity for everyone – you, your company, or institution – to partner with charities in Singapore and/or areas where needs exist, and make an impactful difference. By coming together and contributing to the social causes you care about, we can support one another in the year ahead. Together, we can show that Singapore cares.

As 2017 approaches, there could be more challenges ahead that we have to face.  But I take heart in knowing that we will all walk this journey together with our loved ones and support one another as one big Singapore family.

Happy 2017!

Why Care?

By Parliamentary Secretary A/P Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim

It’s been a long day. You alight from the MRT, relieved to tap out at the gantry because you’re inching closer to home. Easing into a slow walk, you make a mental checklist of what you need to do tomorrow.

The sounds of traffic quieten down as you reach the void deck. You begin your climb up to the 2nd storey where a hot shower and bed awaits.

Someone new catches your eye.

A rugged elderly man, slightly hunched, shuffling towards a corner near the staircase landing. He kicks off his shoes.

Should you take a closer look?

The corner is meticulously prepared. A straw mat marks his narrow territory. Some bulky plastic bags form a small fort at the foot of the mat. The man’s hair has not met the familiarity of a comb for some time. He prepares to lie down, perhaps to quietly spend the night.

Seems like he has settled here recently. But why is he alone? Are his family members looking out for him?

You hesitate. But shouldn’t you do something? At least ask him what is going on?

What do you do?

Take a photo and spread awareness about this? But what about the elderly man’s privacy?

Approach him? What if he brushes you off or scolds you for being kaypoh?

You hesitate again, weighing the choices.

So, why should you care?


Caring for others and helping them is not always as easy as it sounds. In fact, it is entirely possible to be unappreciated for it. And we must be prepared for this.

As you have seen in the video and story above, it can be quite unglamorous work. And sometimes, people may not even want your help.

In October this year, we held the MSF Volunteer Awards and honoured 169 volunteers ranging from foster parents to probation officers.

MVA_Faishal

76-year-old Mdm Thiravingadam has been a foster parent to 42 children over 40 years!

At such ceremonies, we thank and appreciate volunteers for their tireless dedication. But a lot goes on behind the scenes for them. A lot that we do not know about.

Just like the story above, volunteers may also have started off with some doubts. Or question how they can go about helping.

I think the larger question is not whether we should be helping. That is pretty clear to us.

It’s how we should be caring and helping. There are many ways to address the how, but it requires collective support. For those in need, we should create opportunities for them to get back on their own two feet.

But it is not enough to snap a photo or upload a video, and leave it at that. We are stronger in spirit and richer in our humanity when we can extend a hand in our own way. And for help organisations and Government agencies to complement this with further assistance.

So, my next question is – how will you care?


Please visit MSF Facebook to leave a comment!