70-year-old Colours Her Way to Health

At the Fei Yue Senior Activity Centre in Hougang, a fellow resident passes Mdm Jaya Lidya d/o Samuel  an outline of a house overlooked by trees. Beaming, Mdm Jaya gets to work, shading the branches brown. This is part of a typical day for the 70-year-old who, like the scene she is colouring, is a picture of exuberance.

When she was young, though, Mdm Jaya contracted polio, which has affected her mobility. In spite of her condition, she is determined to live a full life, enjoying wheelchair dancing, flower making, cooking and bingo, – among other activities at Fei Yue Senior Activity Centre.

Mdm Jaya is also close to her family. She lives with her sister in a HDB studio apartment. She has a big extended family, too, including nephews and nieces who like to share jokes with her whenever they visit.

Besides this crucial family support, she receives cash assistance as part of ComCare Long Term Assistance (LTA). Since 2016, this scheme has helped to defray some of her living and medical expenses.

From 1 July 2019, Mdm Jaya, along with other ComCare LTA beneficiaries, will receive an increase in cash assistance.

Mdm Jaya cites her family and her social service officer from Social Service Office @ Hougang, Priya d/o Sreetharan, as her pillars of support.  Having worked together over the past two years, Mdm Jaya and Priya have grown particularly close. This connection is important, says Priya, for understanding and meeting the needs of those they serve.

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Mdm Jaya with Priya from Social Service Office @ Hougang and Moses from Fei Yue Cluster Support

Apart from ComCare LTA, Mdm Jaya receives aid from the Silver Support Scheme and the Pioneer Generation package. Helping Mdm Jaya get the best support from the network of support, Priya says, requires coordination between various agencies, like Fei Yue Senior Activity Centre and Tan Tock Seng Hospital, where Mdm Jaya receives her medical treatment.

For Mdm Jaya, volunteering is all part of quality living. She takes part in various events by organisations for the disabled, and is helping to raise funds for the Singapore Cancer Society.

“I do a lot of activities,” says this pioneer who has become an invaluable member of her community. “You can say I’m quite busy!”

For more information on the ComCare enhancements, see here.

More on MSF’s announcements here.

Farewell and thank you for making Singapore more caring

Today marks my last day at the Ministry of Social and Family Development (MSF). When I first entered politics, I had hoped to come to MSF. So it was with great delight that I was posted here in 2015.

Throughout my time at MSF, I have been heartened to work with so many colleagues and partners in the social sector who are passionate and dedicated in their efforts to assisting fellow Singaporeans who need a helping hand. A big thank you to all the heart and hard work that you have put in.

I believe strongly in MSF’s mission – “To nurture resilient individuals, strong families, and a caring society” – and would like to share my hopes for the ministry and Singapore.

Nurturing resilient individuals

MSF started out as a social welfare department in 1946, and while it has gone through many portfolio changes, the aim is still the same – to ensure no one gets left behind. The government has many social safety nets in place for those who need help. We don’t want to just catch them when they fall; more importantly, we want to help them get back onto their feet.

SSO
From my visit to the Social Service Office (SSO) @ Jalan Besar in 2016

We have been working on more upstream measures to identify what are some of the precursors, and step in to help the families or individuals prevent the situation from deteriorating. Over the years, we have set up a network of 24 Social Service Offices across the island to make it easier for those in need to get the help they need. We have also intensified the partnership with the Family Service Centres in the journey with these families and individuals to improve their situations.

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From my visit to Shangri-La’s Rasa Sentosa Resort & Spa to find out how they practice inclusive hiring.

While our programmes and policies will lay the foundations for an inclusive and caring society, we want to build a Singapore that embraces and supports persons of all abilities. Even as we are working at this through the three Enabling Masterplans, it is important to continue strengthening support for our caregivers, as well as bring the wider Singapore on board to be more understanding of those with different needs. This will translate to acceptance by the society for those with special needs, an increase in employment opportunities, and more empathy for caregivers. I appreciate the efforts by the National Council of Social Service, SG Enable, social service organisations and our community partners in their various capacities. I believe we can continue to do more to achieve our aims for an inclusive Singapore.

Building strong families

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From Families for Life Council’s Father’s Day Picnic in 2016

KidSTART is an initiative that is very close to my heart, and I am heartened to see positive results one year into our pilot. Early intervention makes a difference, and we want to help families as early as we can to help level the starting ground for children so they have a chance at a brighter future.

I am grateful to our officers working on KidSTART, community partners, schools and volunteers for providing child development and parenting support to these families and their children. I hope you will continue to work together to give disadvantaged children a good start in life. KidSTART is the right thing to do, and we must continue to do it well.

Family is the most important unit in society, and it’s important to ensure that our family ties remain strong with our immediate and extended families. Parents, do continue to spend time with your children. I have always urged (and will continue to urge) parents to make a conscious choice to be present in our children’s lives. It makes a difference in their developmental and emotional wellbeing. Don’t be disheartened in your parenting journey. Nobody becomes the perfect mum or dad the moment the baby is born. We understand that and have rolled out various parent programmes throughout the years, such as the Positive Parenting Programme to help you as a parent.

Thank you to the Families for Life Council for championing family time and bringing couples and families together at high-point events such as the Singapore Parenting Congress, Marriage Convention and Families for Life Celebrations. Your recent initiative, “My Family Weekend” was a commendable effort that rallied the support of the community and corporates. Would also like to thank the Centre for Fathering and our other community partners for taking the lead in encouraging active fathering and building strong families!

Fostering a caring society

In much of our journey to help Singaporeans, we have had the support of many community partners. I am very grateful and thankful. If we want to achieve in our ideal vision of Singapore, we need the help of the community. Volunteers are very important, especially in the area of MSF’s work and the social service sector. We see changes in our clients when they get the support of the whole kampung – families, friends, neighbours etc.

We want to develop the culture of giving and living out our values. Everyone can play a part and collectively we can make a bigger impact. The whole SG Cares movement is important. It cannot be a fad that runs for a couple of years. I will continue to drive SG Cares, together with Grace and Desmond. We are encouraged by many of the corporates, schools and community who have partnered us in support of SG Cares. I hope more of you would join us by starting various community initiatives, volunteering with your friends, or curating efforts in your neighbourhood.

Thank you and don’t give up

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From our recent MSF Family Active Day.

To all my colleagues at MSF, thank you for what you do. Your work is often not easy, especially when facing difficult decisions concerning safety and welfare of the vulnerable. Don’t give up and do continue to make a difference. It really matters. I will always root for MSF, its causes and its people, regardless of where and in which capacity I serve.

I leave MSF in the good hands of Desmond, who shares the same heart for building a resilient and compassionate society. Let’s continue to work together to build a better Singapore!

Staff profile: Giving hope through social assistance

Limin provides social assistance as a Manager at SSO@Bukit Merah, and works together with agencies in the community to meet the needs of her client holistically.


“How much is enough, and how much is too much?”

As a Social Assistance Officer, Limin often faces the dilemma of striking the balance for every client. She has to consider the needs of her clients in providing financial assistance, but at the same time ensure that she helps to preserve individual resilience and foster self-reliance.

Mdm Ang (not her real name) first came to Limin on financial issues she faced as a part-time working mother raising 2 teenage children. It was seemingly a simple issue where Limin would assist Mdm Ang to seek full-time employment while providing her with short-term assistance.

However, it soon evolved into a multi-faceted challenge within a matter of months. Mdm Ang’s younger son dropped out of secondary school, and her older son married his pregnant girlfriend Clara (not her real name) while he was still serving National Service.

With major changes to the family’s situation, Limin had to come up with an entirely new action plan to better support Mdm Ang with her changed circumstances.  “From seeking employment for Mdm Ang, it became having Mdm Ang look after the newborn child, while we found Clara a job to support the family,” Limin recalled.

Knowing that Mdm Ang had been linked up with a Family Service Centre (FSC), Limin worked closely with the FSC social worker to coordinate support for her in meeting her various needs.

Although there were minor hiccups along the way when Clara left her first job, she eventually sustained a stable employment with help and encouragement from Limin and the FSC social worker. Clara also started becoming more willing to learn how to care for her baby.

The family managed to maintain sufficient income after about a year, and it was heartening for Limin when Mdm Ang said that the family wanted to try coping on their own without relying further on financial assistance.

There were times along the way when Limin felt at a loss as issues evolved, but she was encouraged when she saw significant improvements to the life of the family.

“I’m glad that I could work with other agencies to go in-depth into the different issues that my clients face. Seeing each case through from start till end, I am able to witness how financial assistance in a calibrated manner can positively impact them,” she said. “It reminds me of the meaning of my job, and that it is all worth it when I see how it makes a difference in their lives.”

If you are interested to pursue a meaningful career at MSF, find out more information here or view available job listings here.

A brief overview of MSF’s work 2016

Whether it is to support families, foster a more inclusive Singapore, or provide a good start for every child, MSF will continue to work to nurture a resilient and caring society that can overcome challenges together.

Here are some of what MSF has done in 2016:

msf2016-strengtheningfamilies

Families are the building blocks of our society. That’s why we believe that having strong families is key to our nation’s progress.

Find out more:
Safe and Strong Familes Pilot: http://tinyurl.com/SSFpilot
Marriage Preparation Programme: http://tinyurl.com/marriageprogrammes
Positive Parenting Programme: http://tinyurl.com/TriplePPilot
Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA): http://tinyurl.com/LPAFeeWaiver

msf2016-inclusivesociety

Building a society that supports those who come from less-advantaged backgrounds and those living with disabilities is important to us.

Find out more:
ComCare Assistance: http://tinyurl.com/ComCareAssistance
SHARE as One: http://tinyurl.com/SHAREasOne
Recommendations for 3rd Enabling Masterplan: http://tinyurl.com/Recommendations3EM

msf2016-goodstartforchildren

Our children are the nation’s future, and having a strong start in life will enable them to reach their potential in adulthood.

Find out more:
Baby Bonus scheme: http://tinyurl.com/BabyBonusScheme
KidSTART: http://tinyurl.com/KidSTARTpilot
Early Childhood Manpower Plan: http://tinyurl.com/EarlyChildhoodManpowerPlan
Amendments To The Child Development Co-Savings Act: http://tinyurl.com/AmendmentsToCDCA

Family is where the heart is

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(Taken on a family trip to Japan, Dec 2016)

The picture you see above was first shared on my Instagram page, which received an interesting comment: “落叶“.

Literally translated, this phrase refers to how the fallen leaves have returned to its roots. The fallen leaves are a metaphor for old age, and ‘roots’ describe one’s home.

In a related way, I think ‘roots’ also represents our families – where our values, memories and ties were first formed, and firmly anchored. If you think about it, the family really is the building block for a safe and stable society, and it is important for our families to stay strong. Families are also who we turn to for comfort and support, and a refuge when times are difficult and uncertain.

Giving children a good start in life

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(During my visit to one of the KidSTART group sessions at Henderson.)

This year, we’ve made some progress to enhance our support to help strengthen families, as well as to help our children get a good start in life. It’s a continual effort, and I’m proud of the work put in by my MSF team. It is a cause they feel passionate about.

For example, to help couples build stronger marriages, we have been offering an evidence-based introductory marriage preparation programme, PREP, free-of-charge, at the Singapore Registry of Marriage (ROM) during lunch time.

To give our children a good start in life, we rolled out additional support measures this year. All newborns now get a $3,000 Child Development Account First Step grant. Changes to the Child Development Co-Savings Act accorded all new mothers the full 16-week maternity leave, and mandatory two weeks of paternity leave for new fathers from 2017. We made important moves on maternity leave and the CDA account to better support unwed mothers.

KidSTART is a pilot programme that aims to provide more assistance to children from vulnerable backgrounds to ensure their future success. This effort by the Early Childhood Development Agency brings together family, community and pre-schools to build a strong support system for the child. I look forward to meeting the little ones at their first day of (pre)school in a few days’ time. 🙂 I trust that this programme will succeed and move on beyond its pilot status.

Faishal has also shared in his blog post about the work done to help parents via the Positive Parenting Programme and the Safe and Strong Families pilot, as well as to support parents and children amidst divorce.

We are also working to further develop the early childhood education sector to offer meaningful and rewarding careers for Singaporeans, and quality care and education for our children. We announced the Early Childhood Manpower Plan this year, and we hope to attract another 4,000 educators by 2020.

Building a community of support for those in need

Notwithstanding our best efforts, unfortunate circumstances do occur. We need to be always ready to provide help and timely services to the more vulnerable in society.

Our ComCare schemes disbursed $130 million to about 87,000 beneficiaries in FY2015, this is 10% higher than the previous financial year. We have also enhanced the assistance package to households on ComCare Long-Term Assistance by raising the cash assistance rates for our beneficiaries. For example, a one-person household will now receive $500 per month from $450. We will continue to work closely with the community and voluntary welfare organisations to support the less unfortunate among our midst.

Even as we recognise families as important sources of refuge and support, sadly, for some, they can be vulnerable to abuse by loved ones. Last month, we launched a three-year “Break the Silence” campaign to encourage bystanders to speak up against family violence. Violence is not a private matter and is not acceptable.  All of us have a role to play to step up and help, by having the courage and knowledge to take action.  You can interrupt incidents of family violence with little acts of kindness, and contact the various help centres. Do call the Police immediately if a life is in danger.

 


(Ah Ma made the first step to break the silence against family violence.)

For those who need foster homes and families for support, we were pleased to see an increase in fostering as we celebrated 60 years of fostering in Singapore. Foster parents are such incredible big-hearted folks who open their homes and heart to care for vulnerable children. To further support the efforts taken to help these children, a third fostering agency will be set up in 2017.

Fostering a more inclusive Singapore

We have also achieved much in helping each and every Singaporean to fulfil their potential, regardless of their abilities. In the past two years, MSF, together with MOE and SG Enable, piloted the School-to-Work Transition Programme with five Special Education schools to facilitate a smooth transition from school to the workplace for graduating students with disabilities. I am heartened that 80% of the first graduating cohort of were successfully employed, and 83% stayed in the job for more than six months.

Just last week we received the 3rd Enabling Masterplan report from the steering committee led by Ms Anita Fam. We will study their findings and recommendations carefully to make Singapore even more caring and inclusive for persons with disabilities.

Supporting one another in the year ahead

While MSF continues to do its best to support the vulnerable and those in need, and strengthen families so that they can fulfil their dreams, it is also my hope that fellow Singaporeans can do their part to care for one other.  If we could all reach out to others in the community, and begin to look beyond ourselves and our own families, we would begin to see a very different society – one that is more caring, more selfless and more compassionate.

One way you can show support to one another is through the Singapore Cares movement. Many of us have expressed the desire to do more and work with others to support individuals and families that need help. The movement is an opportunity for everyone – you, your company, or institution – to partner with charities in Singapore and/or areas where needs exist, and make an impactful difference. By coming together and contributing to the social causes you care about, we can support one another in the year ahead. Together, we can show that Singapore cares.

As 2017 approaches, there could be more challenges ahead that we have to face.  But I take heart in knowing that we will all walk this journey together with our loved ones and support one another as one big Singapore family.

Happy 2017!

“If we can help, we will”

14125204_xxlBy Li Li@MSF

As an officer in the Office of the Commissioner for the Maintenance of Parents (CMP), Li Li conducts conciliation during which she tries to persuade the children to maintain their parents. She also assists the elderly and their family, by referring them to other social or voluntary agencies for support and/or assistance.


 Li Li has lost count of the number of times she has been scolded by the adult children of the elderly she is tasked to help.

As she attempts to persuade these children to support their parents, the common response she gets is: “You’re just an outsider. If you’re the welfare ministry, provide the money then.”

The elderly, who approach her at her Lengkok Bahru office or who are referred to her by MPs, Family Service Centres and Social Service Offices (SSOs), are often those who are unable to support themselves. Hence, they have to struggle to get maintenance from their children.

After interviewing them, Li Li contacts the children to hear their side of the story and possibly, persuade them to support their parents. This step though is often the hardest part of the process – and her job.

In the course of trying to even speak with the children, she has had them bang the table, threaten her, and slam the door in her face when she tried to visit them at home.

“Before joining, I thought it was nice to offer help to people,” Li Li says. “But here, it’s a bit different. You try to intervene, you get scolded kaypoh[1].”

And even when she gains access into these families’ lives, she often finds herself thrown in the middle of a mind-boggling moral dilemma.

She recalls the time when a woman approached her for help after her husband became paralysed and could not work.  The case turned out to be more complicated, however, when she found that the woman was the second wife of the man. The children from his first marriage were unwilling to maintain him because they were angry with him for remarrying.

To add to that, his stepchildren – the woman’s children from her previous marriage – saw no obligation in supporting a stepfather who had not raised them up. Who then, was to be made to support their father?

Then there are the thorny cases she has seen more than once – children who refuse to support their parents because they had been abused by them when they were young. Should she still make the children pay?

Topping it all off are the misconceptions people have of her job and her role.

The elderly think she can help them get their children to support them beyond their basic needs – such as a parent who came to her wanting his child to give him money for airfare – while the children think she sides with the elderly and that she is just here to force them to pay.

Yet, despite the rough times and misconceptions, Li Li continues to strive on, contented with the compelling sense of achievement that she is able to break ground.

As an officer constantly on the ground, Li Li occasionally takes on other responsibilities, such as referring parents and children with their consent to other social or voluntary agencies for other support and/or assistance.

“If we can help, we try to help,” she says.

More than that, it is the satisfaction she gets from watching families reconcile and reconnect, as well as helping the elderly get their maintenance, that keep her on the job.

She recalls the case of an absent father who was remorseful of his past and volunteered at a senior activity centre to make amends. Believing their father was sincere in his efforts to change, his children eventually agreed to maintain him. And to Li Li, witnessing such grace and forgiveness, can sometimes be all that she needs.

[1] Kaypoh: A Singlish term, that can be used to describe a person/an action as nosy or a busybody.