Honouring extraordinary employees with disabilities

In the course of a typical day at the Registry of Marriages (ROM), Angalamma d/o Marimuthu meets about 12 to 15 couples, verifying their documents and answering their queries.

Seeing the happy faces of those about to tie the knot is the highlight of her job, says the 56-year-old customer service officer. After 27 years at ROM, she remains an “extremely hardworking staff” who is always cheerful and smiling, says ROM Registrar Penny Tham.

Angalamma first joined ROM as a typist, before working her way through four promotions to her current position. She is seen by many of her colleagues as an elder sister and mentor at the workplace.

In recognition of her contributions and dedication, she was one of five winners of the Exemplary Employee award at the Enabling Employers Awards (EEA) in July 2019

The EEA, launched in 2011, is organised by SG Enable to recognise organisations and individuals who have committed to integrating people with disabilities in the workforce. Since then, more than 300 awards have been given out. In its fifth edition in 2019, the EEA presented 19 employer awards, 78 certificates of recognition to inclusive organisations, and 14 individual awards.

Angalamma was honoured as Exemplary Employee for making her mark through extraordinary performance in the workplace. This accolade means a lot to Angalamma, who was born with bilateral congenital club foot. She says the award motivates her to work even harder.

“I would like to encourage all persons with disabilities not to feel self-pity because of their disability,” she says. “If you fail at something, try again…The important thing is to put aside disappointment, build up confidence and not be worried about the perceptions of others.”

Angalamma’s upbeat view on life is buttressed by supportive supervisors and colleagues. When she is not attending to couples, she is at her workstation tabulating statistics and collating returns from marriage solemnisers. Her colleagues ensure the path is kept clear of obstacles so that she can physically move around with ease and peace of mind.

Colleagues have also arranged files and cupboards at a convenient height for Angalamma to access them. If she has errands to run, she can turn to her colleagues for help.

When asked what advice she would give to employers looking to be inclusive, she says, “Show encouragement. Be patient.”