Community support – key to successful probationer rehabilitation

Toh Yue Sen, a 25-year-old Sports and Exercise Science student at Republic Polytechnic, hopes to get a degree after completing his diploma. A decade ago, pursuing an education was the farthest thing from his mind.

Back then, as a teenager, he had committed theft and robbery and was ordered to reside in Singapore Boys’ Home for two years. A few years later, he was remanded in prison for acting on behalf of an unlicensed moneylender.

During the prison remand, Yue Sen met Selina Yeo, his Investigating Probation Officer. Guided by Selina, he re-looked at where he was headed and took stock of his life prospects.

“I cried because I was touched when she talked about my family, my sisters,” he says. He realised how his incarceration would affect his loved ones and was relieved when he was placed on probation by the Court.

That was just the start of his rehabilitation. Supported by MSF’s Probation and Community Rehabilitation Service, Yue Sen started to make positive changes to his life.

He performed community service at a welfare home at Pelangi Village where he befriended elderly residents. He viewed his time there as “a gift” instead of a mere assignment, thanks to the friendly staff and residents. Yue Sen’s parents told Selina that he became more patient after serving at the home.

Yue Sen’s class advisor, Cass Lim, in ITE College East also played a crucial role in his rehabilitation. She recommended him for various courses and worked closely with Selina to guide him. With their support, Yue Sen became a role model in his fitness training course at ITE, where he was selected to be the class discipline master. He was also awarded the National Youth Achievement Award in 2018 for his leadership qualities and exemplary conduct in school.

This network of coordinated care across organisations is a key focus in MSF’s community rehabilitation efforts. To support probationers in their rehabilitative journey, MSF collaborates with many corporate and community partners to provide them and their families with diverse types of support. Strong community and family support were key factors that supported a high probation order completion rate of 84% in 2018.

Yue Sen shared that his parents played a big part in his rehabilitation. His father began taking an active interest in his boxing hobby, and supported him during a competition in July 2015. This helped to bond the family together.

Selina says Yue Sen’s parents acknowledged and supported his efforts to change himself, which improved their relationship. Yue Sen shared that he is now able to communicate openly with them without worrying that they may end up arguing or disagreeing with one another. He added that poor family communication could be the reason why some probationers struggle.

“Successful rehabilitation really starts with the family,” adds Selina. Recognising this, MSF is collaborating with Functional Family Therapy LLC to implement Functional Family Probation that focuses on the involvement of everyone in the family to strengthen support for the probationer.

Selina says some probationers do not succeed in rehabilitation because of the lack of family support and unconstructive engagement. “If the probationers are able to focus on developing better relationships with their family and commit to being constructively engaged in their studies or at work, it will encourage them to make amends and be more responsible.”

Yue Sen is committed to staying on the right path. He says he leads a “normal” life, going to school and working part time in the Food and Beverages industry.

His teenage follies and time on probation have taught him about the consequences of wrong decisions, and he is determined to stay out of trouble.

“It’s not worth my time.”