Working together to support children with developmental needs

Iyad Perdaus, the childcare department of voluntary-welfare organization Perdaus, has a Learning and Development Support Unit (LDSU) that runs the MSF-funded Development Support and Learning Support (DS-LS) programmes. This programme, run by therapists and specially-trained Learning Support Educators (LSEds), provide targeted support for pre-school children with mild developmental needs.

As shared in MSF’s Committee of Supply debates 2017, MSF will expand the development support programme to more preschools and build up a pool of 200 LSEds. We speak to Mdm Zaiton Mohd Ali, Head of Iyad Perdaus, on how they are running the DS-LS programme in their centre. Also read about LSEds here and other support services for children with special needs here.


Q: Tell us about Iyad DS-LS

Iyad Perdaus was appointed by MSF on 1 April 2017 as one of the centres providing the Development Support and Learning Support (DS-LS) programmes. We aim to improve children’s developmental outcomes and achieve better school-readiness. Currently, all three of our centres are running the programme to benefit more children.

LDSU Briefing and Sharing
 LSEds doing a briefing and sharing session for our kindergarten teachers on tools for screening.

Q: Share with us about your learning support programmes.

The form teacher uses the Ecological Congruence Assessment to assess if any K1 and K2 children may require additional learning support. Our LSEds will conduct further screening using multiple sets of assessment tools. The children will be referred to a MSF-contracted Educational Psychologist and the consultant team from KKH and NUH.

Based on the child’s needs, a Development Support or Learning Support programme will then be offered to the child once his/her parents have given their consent. Priority will be given to a K2 child as he/she has a shorter runway to start primary school.

In 2018, we have served over 35 children. We are glad that most parents are very supportive of the programme to help the child to be more ready for Primary 1.

Teaching Materials 3
Activities to help children learn to read lower-case letters.

Q: Any memorable stories about students?

Teachers noticed that one child struggled to stay engaged during large group lessons and required one-to-one guidance during writing and reading classes. The LSEd identified that he needed Learning Support in the area of Literacy, and worked with him on areas such as how to write letters, read by sight, and construct sentences.

The child has since shown progress. He can read all lowercase letters and more than 10 common words, and construct at least 4- to 5-word sentences about a picture. In the classroom setting, the child is now more engaged during literacy and writing activities. This is made possible with the collaboration of the class teachers who incorporated some of the strategies shared by the LSEd.

Parents play an important role in the child’s progress and development. His parents were involved through the Home Programme, where the child continues to practice the skills and strategies learned during the sessions and utilise the resources shared by the LSEd through hands-on games or activities at home.

Q: Any key takeaways from running the programme?

With consistency and collaboration from all the stakeholders – parents, teachers and LSEds, children receiving DS-LS will be able to acquire the skills and knowledge, increase their level of engagement, participation and independence, as well as strengthen their social interaction and relationship. It makes our team proud and happy when our students make progress and adjust better transiting to primary school.